Tag Archives: edinburgh

Edinburgh Marathon 18 week training plan

Heart Rate Training Zones

  • Recovery running zone 1                                   144-156bpm
  • Threshold running zone2                                   157-169bpm
  • Tempo running zone     3                                   170-186bpm
  • Interval running zone   4                                   above 186bpm

 

Day of week 18 weeks 17 weeks 16 weeks 15 weeks 14 weeks 13 weeks
Monday Recovery 8mi @ 7.14/mi Recovery 8mi @ 7.07/mi Recovery 8mi @ 7.02/mi Recovery 7mi @ 7.11/mi Recovery 8mi @ 7.05/mi Recovery 8mi @ 6.34/mi
Tuesday Threshld 9mi @ 6.48/mi Recovery 7mi @ 6.49/mi Threshold 10mi @ 6.17/mi Threshold 10mi @ 6.23/mi Recovery 8mi @ 6.43/mi Threshold 10mi @ 5.55/mi
Wednesday Recovery 7mi @ 7.07/mi Recovery 7mi @ 7.09 Recovery 5mi @ 6.46/mi Medium Threshold 13mi @ 6.31/mi Rest Day Threshold 10mi @ 5.52/mi
Thursday Recovery 7mi @ 6.44/mi Threshold 10mi @ 6.18/mi Medium Threshold 12mi @ 6.21/mi Threshold 10mi @ 6.09/mi Threshold 8mi @ 6.12/mi Tempo 11mi Hill Reps
Friday Rest Day Rest Day Tempo 9mi 2x10min + 1x5min Rest Day Recovery 6mi @ 7.02/mi Rest Day
Saturday Recovery 3mi @ 6.55/mi Threshold 10mi @ 6.42/mi Threshold 10mi @ 6.18/mi Tempo 11mi 8x4min off 2min Nationl XC 7.25mi @ 6.06/mi Medium Threshold 13mi @ 6.01/mi
Sunday Ferriby 10 0:58:34 @ 5.50/mi Long Threshold 18mi @ 6.36/mi Long Threshold 18mi @ 6.32/mi Long Threshold 18mi @ 6.26/mi Medium Threshold 14mi @ 6.34/mi Long Threshold 20mi @ 6.30/mi
Total Miles 49mi 60mi 73mi 73mi 55mi 71mi

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How I went from plodder to runner

You might wonder how does someone go from running 100 miles in the mountains to racing marathons on the road? The answer is pretty straight forward to be honest, I followed a simple but effective training plan where the training sessions were tailored to my heart rate zones which were identified by carrying out a lactate threshold test and not running to a set pace. The rest was down to a lot of hard work and commitment.

The first thing I did was recover properly, before regaining my base fitness. I then started logging the miles on the road before starting my training program. In the months between the Ultra Tour of the Lake District and Christmas I worked really hard, slowly building up my mileage and spending more time running in my threshold heart rate zone. This was the key zone used during my marathon build up to improve my strength and speed when running around my marathon pace. Running on the road is very different from trail running as it takes a lot more out of your body. This makes your choice of trainers very important, as they must be able to provide you with the support and cushioning you require. I visited The Lincolnshire Runner (running shop) to have my running gait analysed before choosing my first pair of road running trainers. This ensured that they were suitable for the amount of mileage I was about to carry out.

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The start of my running obsession

At the age of nine I was diagnosed with a disability called Perthes disease which made exercising more or less impossible. I spent weeks on end going in and out of hospital, being placed on traction and having to have a number of operations to lengthen the tendons in my groin. I had to have my hip pinned to try to increase the blood flow into my hip joint and this was followed by 6 weeks in broom stick pots. During this time I was wheel chair bound and then gradually progressed to using crutches and carrying out regular physiotherapy sessions to build up the muscles in my legs, as they were too weak to support my body weight. Perthes disease (also known as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, or Calve Perthes disease, is a childhood disorder which affects the head of the femur (the ball of the ball and socket joint of the hip). In Perthes disease the blood supply to the growth plate of the bone at the end of the femur (called the epiphysis) becomes inadequate. As a result the bone softens and breaks down. The specialists told me that I would never be able to lead a fully active lifestyle due to the shorting of my leg and the weakness within my hip joint but  I stayed positive and tried to be as active as possible throughout my teenage years. I played as much football as my hip could handle and at the age of  eighteen I was finally discharged from the hospital.

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